urchicago:

NEW INTERVIEW: Shining of Norwayby Pawl SchwartzI remember, as a young hipster, a time when I shunned metal. I liked hard music, but only when it wasn’t a genre: it had to have its own reason to be heavy and do it on its own terms. Thank god that I’ve long since come off of that strange, high horse, but even if I hadn’t, Shining of Norway would have still passed the test and had me as a rabid fanboy. They are industrial (if that turns you off, open that mind up); they are metal; their first two albums were instrumental jazz. Shining remain tight as Michael Jackson’s pants but with the same kind of X factor that made bands like Sleepytime Gorilla Museum a crossover and cult success. UR Chicago spoke with Jørgen Munkeby in advance of their upcoming show at The Metro on April 11th.GET TICKETS for Dillinger Escape Plan w/ Shining 04/11/14 @ METRO

urchicago:

NEW INTERVIEW: Shining of Norway

by Pawl Schwartz

I remember, as a young hipster, a time when I shunned metal. I liked hard music, but only when it wasn’t a genre: it had to have its own reason to be heavy and do it on its own terms. Thank god that I’ve long since come off of that strange, high horse, but even if I hadn’t, Shining of Norway would have still passed the test and had me as a rabid fanboy. They are industrial (if that turns you off, open that mind up); they are metal; their first two albums were instrumental jazz. Shining remain tight as Michael Jackson’s pants but with the same kind of X factor that made bands like Sleepytime Gorilla Museum a crossover and cult success. UR Chicago spoke with Jørgen Munkeby in advance of their upcoming show at The Metro on April 11th.

GET TICKETS for Dillinger Escape Plan w/ Shining 04/11/14 @ METRO

2 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #shining  3 notes  View comments 


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politicalwizardry:

Matt Damon, a lifelong friend of Howard Zinn and his family, read excerpts from a speech Howard Zinn gave in 1970 as part of a debate on civil disobedience.

This performance was part of “The People Speak, Live!” with Matt Damon and Lupe Fiasco at the Metro in Chicago, on January 31, 2012, produced by Voices of a People’s History (peopleshistory.us) in collaboration with Louder Than a Bomb: The Chicago Youth Poetry Festival.

Learn more at Facebook.com/VoicesofaPeoplesHistory and on Twitter @VPH.

3 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #matt damon #howard zinn #metro chicago  7 notes  View comments 


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On August 14, 2004, MF DOOM brought his frenzied and fast-paced live show to the Metro stage. The sold out crowd was treated to a night of up-and-coming hip-hop, with comic book artists working live on stage during set breaks.  In true DOOM fashion, the evening was a real mashup between comics and music. Right in between the releases of acclaimed Madvillany and Mm.. Food, this show caught the early-00’s most respected rapper at his creative peak.

On August 14, 2004, MF DOOM brought his frenzied and fast-paced live show to the Metro stage. The sold out crowd was treated to a night of up-and-coming hip-hop, with comic book artists working live on stage during set breaks.  In true DOOM fashion, the evening was a real mashup between comics and music. Right in between the releases of acclaimed Madvillany and Mm.. Food, this show caught the early-00’s most respected rapper at his creative peak.

8 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #mf doom #doom #gunkhole #dj intel #metro chicago #metro30th #8/14/04  3 notes  View comments 


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Two years after the dramatic breakup of post-hardcore legends At the Drive-In, Cedric Bixler-Zavala and Omar Rodríguez-López, frontman and guitarist, respectively, were on the road again as The Mars Volta.  Although their music may have taken a step in the prog direction, the chaotic live shows that were characteristic of At the Drive-In remained a staple of this new endeavor.  Ten years ago, The Mars Volta brought their first tour to the Metro stage, in front of a sold out, crazy-enthusiastic Chicago crowd. Taking place back in the days before people had HD cameras on them at all times, the only video evidence of this show in existence is of the grainy, handheld-camcorder variety.  However, even through the low-def haze, it’s clear that The Mars Volta tore down the house that evening.  The band was relentless, playing through their first record De-Loused in the Comatorium almost in its entirety, to a mosh-happy crowd that kept asking for more.

Two years after the dramatic breakup of post-hardcore legends At the Drive-In, Cedric Bixler-Zavala and Omar Rodríguez-López, frontman and guitarist, respectively, were on the road again as The Mars Volta.  Although their music may have taken a step in the prog direction, the chaotic live shows that were characteristic of At the Drive-In remained a staple of this new endeavor.  Ten years ago, The Mars Volta brought their first tour to the Metro stage, in front of a sold out, crazy-enthusiastic Chicago crowd. Taking place back in the days before people had HD cameras on them at all times, the only video evidence of this show in existence is of the grainy, handheld-camcorder variety.  However, even through the low-def haze, it’s clear that The Mars Volta tore down the house that evening.  The band was relentless, playing through their first record De-Loused in the Comatorium almost in its entirety, to a mosh-happy crowd that kept asking for more.

8 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #the mars volta #cedric bixler zavala #omar rodriguez lopez #de-loused in the comatorium #metro chicago #metro30th #7/24/03  4 notes  View comments 


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Hot on the heels of EVOL, quite possibly the band’s strangest album, Sonic Youth embarked on a North American tour that saw them play Cabaret Metro on July 17, 1986.  Less than a year after their Smart Bar show that eventually led to a live record, the band’s live show had been tweaked enough to justify the bigger stage and larger audience.  With Steve Shelley taking over on drums for Bob Bert, along with the more experimental direction that the band took with EVOL, the night’s set took a more artsy approach to crowd-pleasing than the punkier shows of the band’s then not-so-distant past.  The setlist leaned heavily on their most recent release at the time, and helped forge an early path towards the massive venues and festivals that the group would go on to play.   

Hot on the heels of EVOL, quite possibly the band’s strangest album, Sonic Youth embarked on a North American tour that saw them play Cabaret Metro on July 17, 1986.  Less than a year after their Smart Bar show that eventually led to a live record, the band’s live show had been tweaked enough to justify the bigger stage and larger audience.  With Steve Shelley taking over on drums for Bob Bert, along with the more experimental direction that the band took with EVOL, the night’s set took a more artsy approach to crowd-pleasing than the punkier shows of the band’s then not-so-distant past.  The setlist leaned heavily on their most recent release at the time, and helped forge an early path towards the massive venues and festivals that the group would go on to play.   

9 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #sonic youth #metro chicago #metro30th #7/17/86 #EVOL #NOFX  3 notes  View comments 


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Still early in his half-century long career, Iggy Pop had already served in one of punk’s groundbreaking bands, held a slew of chart-topping singles, and penned an autobiography by the time he made his way to Metro on July 12, 1988. The Michigan-bred rocker’s latest accomplishment when he blew threw Chicago in ’88 was the release of Instinct, his eighth solo LP. After taking squeaky clean, radio-ready pop for a spin, Iggy couldn’t resist returning to the seedy hard rock that kick started his career in The Stooges. Fans welcomed Iggy’s relapse into hard-riffed recklessness and hard ‘n fast rock ‘n roll. While Iggy may not have been falling back into his old hat of stage stunts (rolling around in broken glass, dousing himself in glitter, etc.), he was still a force to be reckoned with onstage. This time, it wasn’t  about theatrics or shock and awe–it was about the music; more importantly, the man behind it.

Setlist (via setlist.fm)
1.     Instinct
2.     Kill City (Iggy Pop and James Williamson cover)
3.     1969 (Iggy and The Stooges song)
4.     Penetration (Iggy and The Stooges song)
5.     Power & Freedom
6.     Shake Appeal (Iggy and The Stooges song)
7.     High on You
8.     Five Foot One

9.     The Passenger
(Photo by Stacia Timonere)

Still early in his half-century long career, Iggy Pop had already served in one of punk’s groundbreaking bands, held a slew of chart-topping singles, and penned an autobiography by the time he made his way to Metro on July 12, 1988. The Michigan-bred rocker’s latest accomplishment when he blew threw Chicago in ’88 was the release of Instinct, his eighth solo LP. After taking squeaky clean, radio-ready pop for a spin, Iggy couldn’t resist returning to the seedy hard rock that kick started his career in The Stooges. Fans welcomed Iggy’s relapse into hard-riffed recklessness and hard ‘n fast rock ‘n roll. While Iggy may not have been falling back into his old hat of stage stunts (rolling around in broken glass, dousing himself in glitter, etc.), he was still a force to be reckoned with onstage. This time, it wasn’t  about theatrics or shock and awe–it was about the music; more importantly, the man behind it.

Setlist (via setlist.fm)

1.     Instinct

2.     Kill City (Iggy Pop and James Williamson cover)

3.     1969 (Iggy and The Stooges song)

4.     Penetration (Iggy and The Stooges song)

5.     Power & Freedom

6.     Shake Appeal (Iggy and The Stooges song)

7.     High on You

8.     Five Foot One

9.     The Passenger

(Photo by Stacia Timonere)

9 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #iggy pop #metro chicago #metro30th #7/12/88  7 notes  View comments 


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Riding the success of “Loser,” Beck and his band embarked on their first worldwide tour during the summer of 1994.  With a characteristically strange live show that suits the man’s unconventionally catchy rock/noise/rap, Beck and company proceeded to slay the Metro stage on June 27th of that year.  Thanks to the power of the internet, the show can be relieved in its entirety, with the opening numbers of that night ready to watch above.  It’s clear, even from the grainy old-school handheld camcorder footage, that Beck was bringing the odd goods on that first tour, switching at will from morose and melancholy to hyper and near-headbanger, always keeping the enthusiastic Metro crowd on its toes.  

10 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #beck #metro chicago #metro30th #6/27/94  2 notes  View comments 


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One of indie rock’s persistent slow burners, Spoon has been cranking out tongue-popping alt-rock for the past 20 years. Upon meeting in Austin, Texas, rockabilly band The Alien Beats, vocalist Britt Daniel and drummer Jim Eno decided to try their hand at avant-garde rock tailored for the masses. The quartet’s appearance at Metro on June 25, 2004, followed the coattails of the release of their acclaimed fifth album, Gimme Fiction. With the new release, Spoon began to push their pulsing piano ballads and spotlight-seizing guitar into new, bare-bones territory. Featuring the foot-stomping single “I Turn My Camera On” and groove-dusting “I Summon You,” Spoon managed to reinvent themselves while remaining the indie rock stalwarts we all wanted to hear.

Check out the eye-catching silkscreen by Philadelphia-based Heads of State above.

One of indie rock’s persistent slow burners, Spoon has been cranking out tongue-popping alt-rock for the past 20 years. Upon meeting in Austin, Texas, rockabilly band The Alien Beats, vocalist Britt Daniel and drummer Jim Eno decided to try their hand at avant-garde rock tailored for the masses. The quartet’s appearance at Metro on June 25, 2004, followed the coattails of the release of their acclaimed fifth album, Gimme Fiction. With the new release, Spoon began to push their pulsing piano ballads and spotlight-seizing guitar into new, bare-bones territory. Featuring the foot-stomping single “I Turn My Camera On” and groove-dusting “I Summon You,” Spoon managed to reinvent themselves while remaining the indie rock stalwarts we all wanted to hear.

Check out the eye-catching silkscreen by Philadelphia-based Heads of State above.

10 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #spoon #britt daniel #jim eno #heads of state #metro chicago #metro30th #6/25/04 #silkscreen  3 notes  View comments 


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1986 marked the end of one of punk’s most groundbreaking and tumultuous bands, Black Flag. Before they decided to end their eight-year run, the California quartet waved Chicago goodbye at Metro on their June 29, 1986 gig. The tour panned out a year following the release of Black Flag’s final studio LP, In My Head. With all music written by the band’s founding member Greg Ginn and lyrics penned by eternal poet discontent Henry Rollins, the album marked the apex of the band’s musicality, showcasing their dabbling’s into free form jazz, metal and punk. Funneling in various lineups throughout the years, the farewell tour featured fan favorite Henry Rollins with his search-and-destroy stage presence and gravely wails, flanked by Greg Ginn’s stalwart guitar work. Black Flag may have faltered in their near-decade career, but they made it apparent at their Chicago swan song that if they were going to leave, it was going to be on a high—and plenty loud—note.

1986 marked the end of one of punk’s most groundbreaking and tumultuous bands, Black Flag. Before they decided to end their eight-year run, the California quartet waved Chicago goodbye at Metro on their June 29, 1986 gig. The tour panned out a year following the release of Black Flag’s final studio LP, In My Head. With all music written by the band’s founding member Greg Ginn and lyrics penned by eternal poet discontent Henry Rollins, the album marked the apex of the band’s musicality, showcasing their dabbling’s into free form jazz, metal and punk. Funneling in various lineups throughout the years, the farewell tour featured fan favorite Henry Rollins with his search-and-destroy stage presence and gravely wails, flanked by Greg Ginn’s stalwart guitar work. Black Flag may have faltered in their near-decade career, but they made it apparent at their Chicago swan song that if they were going to leave, it was going to be on a high—and plenty loud—note.

10 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #black flag #greg ginn #henry rollins #in my head #metro chicago #metro30th #6/29/86  2 notes  View comments 


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Before they hit it big with summer soundtrack cornerstone, “Amber” and platinum-selling records, 311 were a welcomed fixture on the club circuit. The Omaha rockers had a whirlwind year in 1994, and Metro was one of many stops along the road to the fabled “big break.” Two years after Doug “SA” Martinez joined the roster to lend his vocals and turntable skills to the lineup, 311 hit Metro for their June 16, 1994, show. The Omaha quintet had just released their debut the year before and was dutifully awaiting the drop of their sophomore LP, Grassroots; but they managed to work well into the night with a packed 23-song set. Noodling around  jazz inflections and reggae beats, the band fused oft-forgotten genres with classic rock tropes to forge an elastic, insistent breed of alt-rock. Not unlike their laidback musical lean, the show was left untethered by ego and bombast—none of the pomp of a soon-to-be platinum band, and all of the talent.

Setlist (via setlist.fm)
1.     Freak Out
2.     Offbeat Bare Ass
3.     Visit
4.     Taiyed
5.     Homebrew
6.     Do You Right
7.     Omaha Stylee
8.     My Stoney Baby
9.     Silver
10. Summer of Love
11. Nutsymtom
12. Paradise
13. Welcome
14. Luky
15. Nix Hex
16. Plain
17. Applied Science
18. Misdirected Hostility
19. Six
20. Salsa
21. Feels So Good
22. Hydroponic

23. Unity

[ticket stub]

Before they hit it big with summer soundtrack cornerstone, “Amber” and platinum-selling records, 311 were a welcomed fixture on the club circuit. The Omaha rockers had a whirlwind year in 1994, and Metro was one of many stops along the road to the fabled “big break.” Two years after Doug “SA” Martinez joined the roster to lend his vocals and turntable skills to the lineup, 311 hit Metro for their June 16, 1994, show. The Omaha quintet had just released their debut the year before and was dutifully awaiting the drop of their sophomore LP, Grassroots; but they managed to work well into the night with a packed 23-song set. Noodling around  jazz inflections and reggae beats, the band fused oft-forgotten genres with classic rock tropes to forge an elastic, insistent breed of alt-rock. Not unlike their laidback musical lean, the show was left untethered by ego and bombast—none of the pomp of a soon-to-be platinum band, and all of the talent.

Setlist (via setlist.fm)

1.     Freak Out

2.     Offbeat Bare Ass

3.     Visit

4.     Taiyed

5.     Homebrew

6.     Do You Right

7.     Omaha Stylee

8.     My Stoney Baby

9.     Silver

10. Summer of Love

11. Nutsymtom

12. Paradise

13. Welcome

14. Luky

15. Nix Hex

16. Plain

17. Applied Science

18. Misdirected Hostility

19. Six

20. Salsa

21. Feels So Good

22. Hydroponic

23. Unity

[ticket stub]

10 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #311 #metro chicago #metro30th #6/16/94  10 notes  View comments 


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