A punk band whose first show likely caused a notable riot really needs no further questioning—they’ve clearly housed the axe-flailing destruction of the bluntest of genres. With this in mind, Sublime barely needs introduction. Their fusion of reggae and dub infused the incoming third wave of ska with an island flavor that most likely spurred the “Peninsula Riot” on their first show ever, and later tore through Metro during their April 20, 1996, gig. Just on the cusp of cementing themselves in ‘90s alt-rock history and barely a month before the death of lead singer Bradley Nowell, time has transformed the hell-raising rock gig into an unknowing farewell. Wesley Willis Fiasco and DFL were charged with the undertaking of opening for the West Coast punks, but nothing was compared to the headlining act. On the verge of calling it quits and gearing up for the release of their third and final studio album, the California ska punk band played their Metro show like it was their last, rapid-firing dizzying rhythms and screw-turning bass grooves. There’s no question that Sublime left with as much of a bang as when they arrived.
Looking to reminisce about those dodgy mosh pits and deafening riffs? Don’t even try without listening to this live version of “Date Rape.”

A punk band whose first show likely caused a notable riot really needs no further questioning—they’ve clearly housed the axe-flailing destruction of the bluntest of genres. With this in mind, Sublime barely needs introduction. Their fusion of reggae and dub infused the incoming third wave of ska with an island flavor that most likely spurred the “Peninsula Riot” on their first show ever, and later tore through Metro during their April 20, 1996, gig. Just on the cusp of cementing themselves in ‘90s alt-rock history and barely a month before the death of lead singer Bradley Nowell, time has transformed the hell-raising rock gig into an unknowing farewell. Wesley Willis Fiasco and DFL were charged with the undertaking of opening for the West Coast punks, but nothing was compared to the headlining act. On the verge of calling it quits and gearing up for the release of their third and final studio album, the California ska punk band played their Metro show like it was their last, rapid-firing dizzying rhythms and screw-turning bass grooves. There’s no question that Sublime left with as much of a bang as when they arrived.

Looking to reminisce about those dodgy mosh pits and deafening riffs? Don’t even try without listening to this live version of “Date Rape.”

(Source: sublimewiki.com)

12 months ago by metroretrochicago



 #sublime #bradley nowell #wesley willis fiasco #DFL #04/20/96 #metro chicago #metro30th  33 notes  View comments 
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    metroretrochicago: A punk band whose first show likely caused a notable riot really needs no further questioning—they’ve...
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    I was at this show. It sucked. Don’t do drugs. Or at least do them after you play the show.
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